D&R Greenway Presents Talk on Water Features in the Home Landscape

D&R Greenway Presents Talk on Water Features in the Home Landscape

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D&R Greenway Land Trust, in partnership with Rutgers Master Gardeners of Mercer County, presents a lecture, “Water, Water Everywhere and not a Drop to Waste: Water Features in the Home Landscape,” on Thursday, February 22, 7 p.m. at D&R Greenway’s Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place, Princeton. The guest speaker will be John Black, President of the Native Plant Society of New Jersey. Free admission, preregistration urged. RSVP at (609) 924-4646 or rsvp@drgreenway.org. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

“There is nothing more calming and soothing than the sound of running water,” said John Black, president of the New Jersey Native Plant Society and Master Naturalist, as well as a certified interpretive guide. “Whether from babbling brook or gentle waterfall, our brains are hardwired to be drawn to the sound. From birdbaths to focal point of your yard, a water feature can be as simple or elaborate as you want it to be. In my presentation, I will go through the different types of ponds/water features and why you should consider installing one in your garden/yard.”

The lecture will focus on how to design and install water features in the home garden, from rain gardens to ponds and everything in between. Black will discuss site consideration, the types of water features, construction techniques and materials, and the reasons why homeowners should include them in their yards.

Black has volunteered extensively with the Bureau of Land Management in the desert southwest, has served as a member of the board of directors for Atlantic Audubon, and worked extensively with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service doing community outreach and reconnecting people with nature.

“With what we go over, you will be able to create your own little oasis from the hustle and bustle of life right in your own yard,” he said.

“When outside in nature, the sound of a babbling brook is always soothing,” shared Linda Mead, D&R Greenway president and CEO.  “I have a small manmade pond in my own backyard, surrounded by a native plant garden. It is my favorite place to relax after a busy work week. I can’t wait to learn more about how I can enhance this habitat to draw more butterflies and birds!”

“We are delighted to share John Black’s passion for native plants, water, sustainability and habitat for beneficial insects such as dragonflies,” says Ann Vaurio, co-chair, Community Education Committee of Rutgers Master Gardeners of Mercer County. “This program supports our mission to educate the public about responsible gardening practices, including avoiding runoff and the wise use of water in the landscape.”

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